Cordyline ‘Red Star’

Red Star cabbage palm

From £29.95

Cordyline australis ‘Red Star’ is a brightly coloured cultivar with rich blood red foliage sporting bright red midribs. It is smaller growing than the species and less hardy.

Few garden plants are as undemanding and tolerant: from the wet salt-laden gales of the southwest to the parched eastern counties, Cabbage Trees abound.

Origin: New Zealand
Genus: Cordyline
Species / Cultivar: australis var. 'Red Star'
Common Name: Red Star cabbage palm
Synonym: Cordyine indivisa var. 'Red Star'

Plant Biography

Few garden plants are as undemanding and tolerant: from the wet salt-laden gales of the southwest to the parched eastern counties, Cabbage Trees abound. Recent winters have demonstrated that even if reduced to ground level plants will usually re-sprout from the base and quickly regain size.

Vast spikes of scented flowers in late summer can fill a garden with perfume – resultant seed laden trusses help birds through winter.

Cordyline 'Red Star'
Soil: Well drained
Soil that does not show much signs of moisture, either visibly or when handled.
Growth Rate: Fast
Expect to see prolific growth, especially during growing season.
Final Size: Tall
Final size will work as a large stand-alone specimen plant.
Water Requirement: Medium
Once it is established, this plant is likely to only require watering during drier periods.
Maintenance: Low
Minimal skill or input needed beyond the basics, a very independent plant.
Situation: Full Sun to Part Shade
Enjoys direct sun most of the day, but tolerant of fewer sunlit hours or light dappling.
Eventual Height: 2.0 - 4.0 mm
The plant's ultimate height in typical growing conditions.
Hardiness: Hardy
Survives unprotected in an average winter. May need protection in extreme long frosts.
Habit: Evergreen
Always in leaf throughout the year. It won't lose all its leaves at any one time.
Care & Size Guidance

Care & Size Guidance

Whilst less hardy than it’s green cousin, the Red Star cabbage palm can withstand mild winters in sheltered gardens. In harsher climate, where cold winds and frost is expected, the plant should be kept in a planter which can be moved indoors or in an unheated conservatory to overwinter.

Place in deep planters, rather than shallow ones. Feed in spring and summer with a high nitrogen fertiliser. Plants in containers should be watered more often, especially in hot summers.

Expert Tip

Plant in a location which enjoys full sun or afternoon sun for maximum effect. In planters, it goes along perfectly with smaller shrubs and cannas to create a tropical effect. In summer it produces a panicle of sweet smelling white creamy flowers.