Skimmia x confusa ‘Kew Green’

From £16.46

A delightful compact evergreen shrub with glossy dark green foliage and abundant conical panicles of pale green autumn-winter buds, opening to white spring flowers. Thriving in shade, it copes in sun with good moisture – an invaluable addition to the garden or winter container display.

Origin: Parent species from E and SE Asia
Genus: Skimmia
Species / Cultivar: x confusa 'Kew Green'

Plant Biography

Skimmia confusa is a cross of  Skimmia anquetilia and Skimmia japonica, both species originating from temperate regions across East and South East Asia. The genus name was created by European botanists from the Japanese word for the plant, which is ‘Miyama shikimi.’ The first record of Skimmias grown in Europe was at Kew Gardens in 1838.

 

Like many Skimmia cultivars it has been bred to stay reasonably compact. Some are even occasionally selected for bonsai cultivation, but the original species can grow to 6m tall.

Skimmia x confusa ‘Kew Green’
Soil: Ericaceous
Will not tolerate an alkaline pH, so pot in ericaceous compost if site is not neutral to acid.
Growth Rate: Medium
Expect to see moderate growth during growing season.
Water Requirement: Medium
Once it is established, this plant is likely to only require watering during drier periods.
Maintenance: Low
Minimal skill or input needed beyond the basics, a very independent plant.
Situation: Part Shade to Full Shade
Can enjoy several hours of direct sunlight, but also happy in full shade.
Eventual Height: 0.5-1m
The plant's ultimate height in typical growing conditions.
Eventual Spread: 1-1.5m
The plant's ultimate spread in typical growing conditions.
Hardiness: Fully Hardy
Will survive unprotected outdoors in most areas of the UK, even in the harshest winters.
Habit: Evergreen
Always in leaf throughout the year. It won't lose all its leaves at any one time.

Expert Tip

As a male plant, this can be used to pollinate females like Skimmia ‘Kew White’ to ensure they produce their lovely berries.

Care & Size Guidance

They will tolerate some sun with very attentive watering in the summer, so it’s much easier to keep them looking good in a shadier spot. If you have chalky or alkaline soil, it is better to keep them as container specimens using neutral or ericaceous compost.

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