Polystichum neolobatum

Asian Sabre Fern, Long Eared Holly Fern

From £5.96

The Asian Sabre Fern is a tough and striking evergreen fern with dark lustrous foliage and midribs ornamented by coppery fur.

Polystichum neolobatum can reach up to 70 centimetres tall and has an open, upright habit.

Origin: East Asia
Genus: Polystichum
Species / Cultivar: neolobatum
Common Name: Asian Sabre Fern, Long Eared Holly Fern

Plant Biography

This fern is native to China, Japan, Nepal, Taiwan and Tibet. It is often found in regions of the Himalayas, which hints at its hardy disposition.

Like all ferns, it is not a flowering plant – instead reproduction takes place via a complex two stage life cycle. The fern plants we use in gardening are the spore producing stage: Spores can be located on the underside of fertile fronds, often in little pouches called ‘sori.’

Polystichum neolobatum
Soil: Ericaceous
Will not tolerate an alkaline pH, so pot in ericaceous compost if site is not neutral to acid.
Growth Rate: Medium
Expect to see moderate growth during growing season.
Water Requirement: Medium
Once it is established, this plant is likely to only require watering during drier periods.
Maintenance: Low
Minimal skill or input needed beyond the basics, a very independent plant.
Situation: Part Shade
Enjoys several hours of direct sunlight but may enjoy dappling or shade at midday.
Eventual Height: 0.6m
The plant's ultimate height in typical growing conditions.
Eventual Spread: 0.8m
The plant's ultimate spread in typical growing conditions.
Hardiness: Fully Hardy
Will survive unprotected outdoors in most areas of the UK, even in the harshest winters.
Habit: Evergreen
Always in leaf throughout the year. It won't lose all its leaves at any one time.

Expert Tip

This species is best grown in part shade in moist, well drained acidic soils. It can become fairly drought tolerant once fully established.

Care & Size Guidance

Pruning not strictly necessary, but like many evergreen ferns, you can give it a refresh by removing any dead or tatty foliage in spring before the new fronds emerge.

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